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Sunset Song ratings (TV show, 1971-1971)

Sunset Song
Rank 19,257 / 24,585
Trend 0
Genres Drama
Seasons 1
Episodes 6
Total votes 41
Average votes 7
Average rating 7.7 / 10

"Sunset Song" is the first part of a trilogy by Lewis Grassic Gibbon called "A Scots Quair". It is followed by "Cloud Howe" and finally "Grey Granite". It tells the story of Chris Guthrie. Chris lives with her family on a bleak farm in North East Scotland at the beginning of the C. 20th. On her mother's death, she assumes the managing of the farm with her father and her older brother, but the men fall out, leaving Chris and her father to manage it alone. When her father dies, she considers abandoning the farm, but decides to carry on alone. She marries a young farmer, Ewan Tavendale, they have a baby, they are happy for the first time, then the First World War breaks out, Ewan enlists and dies in France, and Chris is left once again to carry on with the farm. BBC Scotland produced the film in 1971, their first colour production. The remaining two parts of the trilogy were produced in 1982 (Cloud Howe) and 1983 (Grey Granite). The composer Thomas Wilson wrote the theme music, which the...

Directors: Moira Armstrong Writers: Bill Craig, Lewis Grassic Gibbon
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Note: season labels indicates the average votes per episode between the parentheses. History (tracking since March 7, 2020)
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